Some of Our Resident Cats

Our sanctuary offers a full-time home for cats with special needs, chronic health issues, and behavioral issues. We currently have 40 full-time residents as well as 3 cats available for adoption. 

Here are some of their stories. (We'll post more as we have time.)

Piper

Piper has CH (cerebellar hypoplasia), a congenital condition that affects the cerebellum of cats and kittens, which is the area of the brain that controls fine motor movement, balance, and coordination. Piper can walk but struggles with using a litterbox, although she tries her best. She also falls over a lot and doesn't always end up where she intends to when walking around the house.

Willow

Willow is a three-legged cat who came to us with diabetes. She had to receive insulin shots twice a day. We worked with our veterinarian on a special high-protein, low carb diet of wet food only. After a few weeks she went into remission and no longer needs shots! She has to eat separate from other cats and can have no dry food at all or she may relapse. So far this diet has worked and she is still in remission. She's a cranky lady who is slowly learning to accept and even show affection to the other cats. We love her and her spirit so much.

Addie & Tucker

Addie and Tucker are a bonded pair of siblings found wandering in a park at under 5 weeks old. They have chronic upper respiratory infections. Addie was found with her eyes matted shut from infection. She can see now, but she has chronic watery eyes. As kittens they were passed over for adoption for months until we decided to keep them at our sanctuary.

Resident Cats Who Crossed the Rainbow Bridge

Nina

Nina was a kitten we took in when the owners were losing their home. She was a sweetheart who bonded with us and loved snuggling with her. We had planned to adopt her out, but she became sick with a rare infection. We tried treatment, but it was unsuccessful. We gave her lots of love and affection until her final moments when we had to let her go. 

It was a very hard loss especially because she was so young, but she was very loved.

Harold

Harold was a former street cat who was trapped as part of a TNR (trap, neuter, return) project. He was emaciated and seriously ill with an upper respiratory infection. It took him quite a while to recover. He was not feral but was somewhat friendly, so we took him in rather than see him return to life on the streets where he'd likely get sick all over again. He lived happily with us until his passing. He loved being in the house and getting affection. We are so grateful we were able to give him a loving, safe, warm home for his final days.

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Compassionate Care Sanctuary

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